CB35 Fuel line shut off valve

For 32, 32+2, 35, and 45 owners.
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Rondo
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I have looked high and low for the shut off valve to the incoming side of the Racor 900 primary filter. I keep thinking there must be one, but have not found it. Can anyone point me to the location?
Rondo
Rondo
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I ended up changing the Racor filter "on the fly" by putting a pile of absorbent pads down, placed a bucket under the bowl, and a second bucket close by. I then opened the top of the filter, grabbed the handle, yanked out the old filter, quickly pushed the new filter into place, then put the top on and screwed it down. I would guess that a quart or more of diesel fuel flowed over the sides. Some into the bucket, some onto the stack of pads under. The clean up took longer than the change.

This CAN NOT be the way this should be done. Is there no one out there who knows where the fuel shut off valve is located, or hidden, as seems the case?

The next "on the fly" task is to prep a valve, cut the hose, and install the valve next to the filter housing. I think Albin did a high quality build on this craft, but this is an egregious and vexing oversight. At this age, I don't do many anymore, but the next survey I do this will get a red flag for a prospective buyer.

Rondo
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Pitou
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I do not have a 35 TE, but a 2006 - 31 TE .. so similar build vintage.

As well with my boat, Albin only put a shutoff valve on the outflow side of the Racor turbine filter and not the inlet side. They did put accessible butterfly shutoff valves at the top of the fuel tanks for both the fuel feed and the fuel return lines. I have a total of four of these butterfly valves. 1 - engine fuel feed, 1 - engine fuel return , 1 - generator fuel feed, 1 - generator fuel return.

Follow the fuel feed to your Racor back to your fuel tank to see what you have and let us know.
kevinS
"drinking rum before 10AM makes you a Pirate, not an Alcoholic"

~ 2006 31TE / Hull# 221
Cummins QSC 8.3 / 500 hp

Former boat ~
~ 2002 / 28TE / Hull# 614
Cummins 6BTA 370 hp / Alaskan Bulkhead
April / '04 ~ May / '13
Rondo
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I should mention that our CB35 is the last one built in Rhode Island, so may have had changes from earlier versions. I can assure that there is no shut off valve between the "out" side of the Racor and the engine, as it can be followed easily. The first thing I did was to try to follow the hose coming to the "in" side of the filter. It disappears into a fiberglas tunnel next to the stringer, never to be seen , again I so far as I can tell. I have put my fiber optic camera into the cockpit access door to look at the top of the tank - nothing to see there. I cannot view the top of the tank from any position I have discovered. No question in my mind there are two supply lines and two return lines, but being able to see them is a problem. I am considering the installation of a couple of round access ports in the back of the dinette settee, to allow a view and access to the top of the tank.

I have decided to install a shut off valve in the line coming "to" the Racor. I will pinch off the hose by placing a thin rubber sheet over it, then using vice grips to halt, or at least slow the flow of fuel, while I push the valve with installed hose barb fitting into the hose. The valve will be in the "off" position, so little risk of the flow getting out of hand, as it shouldn't take long to cut the hose, slip a hose clamp into position, then insert the barbed fitting, and tighten the clamp.

After a logbook with more than 50,000 nautical miles of cruising, I no longer consider myself a novice at messing about in boats, but this has been a real frustration. I really do appreciate your effort. Thank you.
Rondo
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Lovely day in the Tampa area, dry with moderate temps --- a perfect day to spend crawling around the cockpit and below decks on our Command Bridge 35. After more time cutting zip ties, tracing hose runs, feeding quarters to the swear box, and torquing my already creaky knee, I think the light finally came on. I simply got out engineered by Albin. Here is what I have found.

From the first time on the boat, I was impressed with the 2 inch hose that cross connects the two fuel tanks. With a single engine, it makes it easy for fuel to flow between and equalize the level in the two tanks. When filling up, it also means no worries about needing to add fuel to both tanks, as I keep the valves open. However, I wrongly assumed that with the easy flow between tanks, only one pickup and return were needed, or used ---- wrong, wrong, and wrong. Each tank has a pick up tube and a return line. The hoses, are routed all the way aft, behind the rudder post, nowhere close to the location of the Racor filter.

For the fuel supply, the fuel pickup from each tank feeds aft into a bronze "T". Each line has a shut off valve before the "T". The line from the 3rd outlet in the "T" goes to the Racor inlet side. These are not difficult to get to, just that BOTH VALVES MUST BE CLOSED TO HALT FUEL FLOW TO THE RACOR. A Similar situation for the return lines, except no valves - the return from the engine goes to a "T" and then back forward to each tank return port. No doubt this uses a LOT more hose to complete the supply, but now that I am among the learned, it is not a problem. There are quite a number of hoses bundled together with hefty zip ties, so a fair bit undoing and subsequent re-doing was necessary. Now that the map is in (volatile) memory, my handy "Sharpie" marker will make short work of labeling the array of hose, fittings, and valves behind the rudder post.

We just returned from a little over 4 weeks aboard, travelling from home near Tampa, to Tarpon Springs, then back south as far as Naples. The boat performed admirably for the most part, with the only casualty being the Lewmar windlass. It died the last haul-up in the last anchorage we visited. I stopped it with about 3 feet of chain remaining to wash off the sandy mud. It never started again. After getting home, and testing all options, I removed it from the foredeck and took it into the shop. After pulling the case side off, I found the entire gear train and motor surrounded by salt residue, mixed with grease. The internet is full of comments about this issue with these windlass models, so not a rare event, apparently. Needless to say, a new one will be aboard shortly. Just grateful it held on until the last 3 feet.
Along the way we visited friends with docks, and several favorite anchorages and marina stops. We have lived and boated on the Florida West coast for 40 years or so, and fondly remember it when it was much less busy than current times. After missing out on an extended trip last year with all the pandemic issues, it is just good to be back on the water.

I know the season is just getting started for many of you "up there". Here's hoping you all have a great boating season this spring and summer.
Rondo
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Pitou
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Fine job chasing those shutoffs down and glad to hear that you're using your boat!
kevinS
"drinking rum before 10AM makes you a Pirate, not an Alcoholic"

~ 2006 31TE / Hull# 221
Cummins QSC 8.3 / 500 hp

Former boat ~
~ 2002 / 28TE / Hull# 614
Cummins 6BTA 370 hp / Alaskan Bulkhead
April / '04 ~ May / '13
WillieC
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There is nothing more gratifying than chasing down an issue, spurred on by your own natural curiosity, even while making more work for yourself (re-dressing the bundles) and reaching a solid conclusion.

Well done!

And thank you for posting.
Rondo
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Back in the days of full employment, my lawyer joked that the best profit center in the law office was the fax machine and the copier. I have decided that for a marine electrician or repair guy, it is zip ties. Only takes a bit to cut them all loose and lots of grunting and effort to replace- all this after the service is done. AND, it all pays the same.
Cruise on,
Rondo
Rondo
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Just a few final comments in closing. I am still a little frustrated that I cannot find a way to view the top of the tanks, other than the limited view via the very small openings in the forward end of the cockpit. One day, maybe, perhaps, possibly, it might bother me enough to install some access ports.
The other mistake was not even considering that they would route both tank supply hoses from the tanks all the way to near the transom then, join together and route back to the engine primary filter. Same for the return lines. All aside, it is simple now that I know.
Have a great summer season,
Rondo
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